by John Logan


RED FINAL POSTERFebruary 16- March 4

Raw and provocative, RED is a searing portrait of an artist's ambition (Mark Rothko) and vulnerability, as he tries to create a definitive work for an extraordinary setting. A 2010 Tony Award winner, the play is "intense and exciting...a portrait of an angry and brilliant mind that asks you to feel the shape and texture of thoughts....'Red' captures the dynamic relationship between an artist and his creations." - New York Times






Show Dates and Times -

We will be holding panel discussions and talk-back sessions on various days during the run of the performances. * indicates - Panel Discussion ** Indicates Talk Back Session


Fri 16 -7:30

Sat 17 - 7:30

Sun 18 - 2:00 **


Thur 22 - 7:30 **

Fri 23 -7:30

Sat 24 - 7:30

Sun 25 - 2:00 *



Thur 1 - 7:30 **

Fri 2 -7:30

Sat 3 - 7:30

Sun 4- 2:00


RED premiered at the Donmar Warehouse Theatre, London on December 3rd 2009, Michael Grandage, Artistic Director.

Original Broadway Production produced by Arielle Tepper Madover, Stephanie P. McClelland, Matthew Byam Shaw, Neal Street Productions, Fox Theatricals Ruth Hendel/ Barbara Whitman, Philip Hagemann/Murray Rosenthal and the Donmar Warehouse.

Mark Rothko
Born Marcus Rotkovitch in the town of Dvinsk, Latvia, then part of the Russian Empire, Mark Rothko immigrated to the United States with his family at the age of ten, settling in Portland, Oregon. A gifted student, Rothko attended Yale University on scholarship from 1921-23, but disillusioned by the social milieu and financial hardship, he dropped out and moved to New York to "bum around and starve a bit." A chance invitation from a friend brought him to a drawing class at the Art Students League where he discovered his love of art. He took two classes there but was otherwise self-taught. Rothko painted in a figurative style for nearly twenty years, his portraits and depictions of urban life baring the soul of those living through The Great Depression in New York. The painter Milton Avery offered Rothko both artistic and nutritional nourishment during these lean years. In the 1930s, Rothko exhibited with The Ten, a close-knit group of nine (!) American painters, which included fellow Avery acolyte, Adolph Gottlieb. Success was moderate at best but the group provided important incubation for the Abstract Expressionist school to come. The war years brought with it an influx of European surrealists, influencing most of the New York painters, among them Rothko, to take on a neo-surrealist style. Rothko experimented with mythic and symbolic painting for five years before moving to pure abstraction in the mid 1940s and ultimately to his signature style of two or three rectangles floating in fields of saturated color in 1949. Beginning in the early 1950s Rothko was heralded, along with Jackson Pollock, Willem deKooning, Franz Kline and others, as the standard bearers of the New American Painting--a truly American art that was not simply a derivative of European styles. By the late 1950s, Rothko was a celebrated (if not wealthy) artist, winning him three mural commissions that would dominate the latter part of his career. Only in the last of these, The Rothko Chapel in Houston was he able to realize his dream of a truly contemplative environment in which to interact deeply with his artwork. RED presents a fictionalized account of Rothko’s frustrated first attempt to create such a space in New York’s Four Season’s restaurant. Rothko sought to create art that was timeless; paintings that expressed basic human concerns and emotions that remain constant not merely across decades but across generations and epochs. He looked to communicate with his viewer at the most elemental level and through his artwork, have a conversation that was intense, personal and, above all, honest. A viewer’s tears in front of one of his paintings told him he had succeeded. While creating a deeply expressive body of work and garnering critical acclaim, Rothko battled depression and his brilliant career ended in suicide in 1970.